NIHR Maudsley BRC Blog

Our latest news & events

New funding for innovative neuroimaging research

The NIHR Maudsley BRC has launched two new funding opportunities to support neuroimaging research to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on underrepresented groups and to apply novel analytical methods to existing neuroimaging data.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 3 Aug 2021

Cognitive flexibility potential new target in treatment resistant schizophrenia

Researchers at King’s College London have found that an important brain mechanism that allows us to switch between thinking about two or more ideas may help treat patients with schizophrenia who do not respond well to current treatments. 

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 1 Apr 2021

Genetic study reveals metabolic origins of anorexia

A global study, led by researchers at King’s College London and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, suggests that anorexia nervosa is at least partly a metabolic disorder, and not purely psychiatric as previously thought.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 15 Jul 2019

Largest study of its kind identifies 20 new genes linked to bipolar disorder

The largest genetic study of bipolar disorder ever, supported by the NIHR Maudsley Biomedical Research Centre, has identified 30 genetic variants that act to increase the risk of developing bipolar disorder, 20 of which are newly discovered.

The large-scale genome-wide association study was undertaken by a group of 207 institutions from 22 countries. The study was published in Nature Genetics.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 2 May 2019

Largest ever study of depression and anxiety now recruiting individuals from Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales

Researchers at King’s College London launched the largest ever single study of depression and anxiety in September 2018, recruiting in England, and are now opening the study in Northern Ireland, Scotland, and Wales. By recruiting at least 40,000 people who have experienced either depression or anxiety at some point in their life, the Genetic Links to Anxiety and Depression (GLAD) study will make important strides towards better understanding of these disorders and improving the lives of future patients.

By NIHR Maudsley BRC at 25 Feb 2019